TriathlonSource.info InlineSkateSource.info RockClimbingSource.info BackPackingSource.info

BicycleSource Newsletter


Several years ago, Bicycling magazine published the following data:













MPH KPH Calories / lb-min
8 12.9 0.0295
10 16.1 0.0355
12 19.3 0.0426
14 22.5 0.0512
15 24.1 0.0561
16 25.8 0.0615
17 27.4 0.0675
18 29.0 0.0740
19 30.6 0.0811
20 32.2 0.0891
21 33.8 0.0975
23 37.0 0.1173
25 40.2 0.1441

Add 22 calories/hour for each 100 ft of elevation


To translate this into a calorie burn rate, multiply the calories/lb-hr number by your weight in pounds and by the number of minutes you rode. For a 150 lb rider near sea level, cruising at 25 km/hour burns about 500 calories per hour. Riding at 35 km/hour burns about 900 calories per hour under the same conditions.

Your body's carbohydrate reserves amount to two or three thousand calories, and your fat reserves are more like 70,000 calories. For a typical rider, about 21% of your energy comes from fat, on average, and the rest from carbohydrates; with more carbohydrates being burned at higher levels of exertion. caffeine will increase the percentage of fat consumed for energy to 40% for the same exertion. When you run out of carbohydrates as an energy source, you "bonk" and have to slow right down unless you replace the energy as you use it.

This is just a rough estimate; variables such as the bike, terrain, hills, the aerodynamic efficiency of your tuck, and how efficient your body is will all impact the amount of calories burned quite substantially.

Assuming an upright position on flat terrain, with no wind:











Rider
Weight
12 mph 14 15 16 17 18 19
110 293 348 404 448 509 586 662
120 315 375 437 484 550 634 718
130 338 402 469 521 592 683 773
140 360 430 502 557 633 731 828
150 383 457 534 593 675 779 883
160 405 485 567 629 717 828 938
170 427 512 599 666 758 876 993
180 450 540 632 702 800 925 1048
190 472 567 664 738 841 973 1104
200 495 595 697 774 883 1021 1159
Post a Comment
0 comments posted so far.
new